Call for papers – The Association of Human Rights Institutes Conference

The Association of Human Rights Institutes (AHRI), has issued a call for papers for its next research conference on the theme “Renewing Rights in a Time of Transition: 70 Years of the UDHR.”

Submission deadline: March 5. 

AHRI is a network of over 60 member institutions that carries out research and educational activities in the field of human rights.  Member institutions are from 33 different countries, including several U.S. members.  AHRI’s objective is to bring together human rights researchers from across the disciplines, to facilitate the exchange of ideas and collaboration, and to promote research, education and discussion in the field of human rights.

The 2018 AHRI Human Rights Research Conference will be hosted by the Global Justice Academy at the University of Edinburgh Law School in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 7-8 September 2018.

>> Learn more

Educators for Social Justice Conference

EVENT DETAILS:
When: Saturday, February 24th
Time: 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Where: Wydown Middle School, 6500 Wydown Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63105
Cost: $10-$35

The theme of this years conference is “Building Counter-Narratives for Radical Healing and Hope.” Due to escalating incidents of violence, discrimination, and misrepresentations of truth, many of our children are in need of radical healing and hope. This year’s Educating for Change Conference seeks to hone our great power as educators to build counter-narratives, which disrupt misrepresentations that give voice to alternative facts. This project is historically urgent. Join us in our efforts to use counter-narratives as a tool for fostering hope and healing so that we may resist traditional domination, empower marginalized communities, and move toward sustainable solutions to today’s crises. Keynote speaker, Gholnecsar “Gholdy” Muhammad will be speaking on the intersection of history and language arts ​with a particular focus on the representation of young black women. ​

Make a Difference During International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The 1948 the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide defines genocide as “acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national ethnical, racial, or religious group.” Abuses of human rights are endemic in genocide, and indeed, genocidal acts can be viewed as the ultimate form of human rights violations.

As International Holocaust Remembrance Day approaches on January 27, it is a good time to remember the victims of the Holocaust and to reflect on what we can do to bring about a more humane, just, and compassionate world.  Try this lesson, “Strategies for Making a Difference,” from Facing History and Ourselves‘ newly revised edition of Holocaust and Human Behavior, to challenge your students to do just this. Help them think through small steps they can take to bring about positive change in their community.

>>See  lesson by Facing History and Ourselves

For more information on how you can teach about genocide through a human rights context, please visit our HRE USA’s human rights education library for lesson plans, books, films, take action resources, and more.

>>See further HRE USA resources on genocide

Black Lives Matter Week in D.C.

Attention Educators in the Washington D.C. area!

You are invited you to endorse and participate in the D.C. area Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Schools from February 5-10, 2018 to bring social justice issues into the classroom and empower students of color across the D.C. area.

D.C. Area Educators for Social Justice,  Center for Inspired Teaching, the Washington Teachers’ Union, D.C. area educators, and community members are collaborating on D.C. Area Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Schools. This week of action builds on the momentum of National Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Our Schools campaign taking place in cities across the U.S. to promote a set of local and national demands focused on improving the school experience for students of color.

Each day will explore two to three of the Black Lives Matter movement thirteen guiding principles. In school, teachers across the district will implement Black Lives Matter Week of Action curriculum designed for pre-K through 12th grade classrooms. In the evening, there will be events for educators, students, stakeholders, and community members to actively engage in the movement.

The goal of the Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Schools is to spark an ongoing movement of critical reflection and honest conversations in school communities for people of all ages to engage with critical issues of social justice. It is our duty as educators and community members to civically engage students and build their empathy, collaboration, and agency so they are able to thrive. Students must learn to examine, address, and grapple with issues of racism and discrimination that persist in their lives and communities.

>> Learn More

Civil Rights Movement Teaching Institute

EVENT DETAILS:
When: July 9-27
Where: Duke University, Durham, NC
Stipend/Award: $2700 (The stipend is intended to help participants cover travel, housing, meals, and basic academic expenses)

Application deadline: March 1st

This summer teaching institute was designed by a collaborative team of scholars, veterans, and educators from Duke, the SNCC Legacy Project, Tougaloo College, and Teaching for Change. Participants (classroom teachers in grades 7-12) will learn the bottom-up history of the Civil Rights Movement and receive resources and strategies to bring it home to their students. They will have the unique opportunity to learn from the people who made the civil rights movement happen, and from the leading scholars of the era. Three key narratives will serve as the focus of this institute:

  1. The movement thrust forward its leaders, not the other way around.
  2. The tradition of protest grew out of a long history of activism in the black community.
  3. Grassroots activism was the major engine that led to legislative reforms.

>> Learn more and apply

Media Literacy Course: Using film to bring the world into your classroom

Do you want to learn more about integrating film into your lessons to inspire student discussions and learning on global issues? SIMA Classroom has launched a new Media Literacy Course for educators on Participate’s online, collaborative professional development platform.

Based on SIMA Classroom films and resources, this self-paced course will give you an opportunity to take a closer look at documentary films to explore the impact of visual storytelling to communicate human rights topics; and guiding you through activities that will make it possible to seamlessly integrate film into your lessons. Cost: $25.

>> Learn more and register

Human Rights Training Series @ Columbia University

The Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University is holding two workshops as part of its Human Rights Training Series!


Human Rights Advocacy, Campaign Development, and Engagement Strategies

EVENT DETAILS:
When: Saturday, January 20th and Saturday, January 27th
Time: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Where: Columbia University, International Affairs Building, 420 W. 118 St., New York, NY 10027
Cost: Early bird rate of $295 for those who register by December 21st.  Regular rate of $345.

This two-part interactive workshop is designed to help practitioners strengthen their ability to conduct effective human rights advocacy and develop successful campaigns.

>> Learn more and register


Human Rights Research and Documentation

EVENT DETAILS:
When: Saturday, February 10th and Sunday, February 11th
Time: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Where: Columbia University, International Affairs Building, 420 W. 118 St., New York, NY 10027
Cost: Early bird rate of $295 for those who register by December 21st.  Regular rate of $345.

This two-day interactive workshop is designed to strengthen participants’ human rights research and documentation skills, primarily for the purposes of human rights policy and advocacy.

>> Learn more and register