Workshop on Human Rights Advocacy, Campaign Development, Engagement Strategies

EVENT DETAILS: 

When: Saturday, February 9th from 10am-4:30pm and Saturday, February 16th from Time: 10am-1:30pm
Where: Interchurch Center, 475 Riverside Dr., New York, NY 10027
Cost: $400 (reduced rates available for those with significant financial need)

This two-part interactive workshop is designed to help practitioners strengthen their ability to conduct effective human rights advocacy and develop successful campaigns.

Participants will explore the elements of an effective advocacy strategy, including issue analysis, the development of goals and objectives, and the identification of appropriate targets and tactics; learn how to tailor messages to specific audiences; discuss effective partnerships and how to build coalitions; prepare and receive input on a draft advocacy plan; prepare and participate in role plays to simulate advocacy meetings with policy-makers; discuss relevant case studies of successful campaigns.

Each participant will be encouraged to develop an advocacy plan and role play on an issue of their choosing that is relevant to their work and/or interests.

A certificate of participation will be granted to all those who complete both days of training. Individuals who complete three workshops offered as part of the Human Rights Training Series will receive an ISHR Human Rights Training Series certificate of completion.

Workshop facilitator: Jo Becker, Advocacy Director of the children’s rights division at Human Rights Watch and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University.

>> Learn more and register

Happy Human Rights Day

Today, Monday, December 10th marks the 70th ANNIVERSARY of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A milestone document in the global history of human rights that is as relevant today as it was when drafted seven decades ago.  

Although the UDHR is not in itself legally binding, it has become the procreator of modern international human rights law, providing safeguards – and sometimes lifelines – for thousands of people from all walks of life when national laws fail them. It has parented 16UN human rights treaties that are legally binding, including the twin UN Covenants spanning economic, social and cultural and civil and political rights respectively, plus a host of regional treaties in Africa, the Americas, and Europe.

We now take for granted that such human rights standards can be used to hold our governments to account, but just 70 years ago there were no internationally recognized human rights norms at all. The very fact that the UDHR has stood the test of time is a testament to the enduring universality of its perennial values of equality, justice, and human dignity.

The promise of the UDHR, however, has yet to be fulfilled because, as all advocates know, human rights are not a given but rather require a continuous struggle to get and once that has been achieved to keep. In other words, it is down to us to promote its ethical vision as new forms of nationalism and populism threaten to challenge our world.  

At HRE USA we believe human rights education is key to ensuring a future in which all people’s rights are respected, protected, and fulfilled. Please consider supporting HRE-USA by making a tax-deductible contribution on our behalf to our fiscal sponsor, the Center for Transformative Action, a 501(c)3organization. Your donation will allow us to continue to advocate for and further develop programming that supports human rights education across the United States.

In honor of the 70th Anniversary and to help everyone celebrate the gift of the UDHR, HRE USA has created this online resource kit. You can also join the international campaign to #Standup4humanrights. 

 HAPPY HUMAN RIGHTS DAY

 

70th Anniversary of the UDHR – Resource Kit

The UDHR is turning 70 on December 10th! Find ways to celebrate, teach, and more with HRE USA’s online resource kit or participate in our UDHR poster contest.

December 10th, 2018 will mark the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). A milestone document in the global history of human rights, the UDHR is infused with values and ideals drawn from the world over. The UDHR – the most translated document in the world, available in more than 500 languages — is as relevant today as it was on the day that it was proclaimed.

Join HRE USA in celebrating the gift of the UDHR and re-affirm the enduring human rights principles and standards that it helped establish.

Celebrate National Voter Registration Day #UseMyVoice #UseMyVote

Today is National Voter Registration Day! 

To help celebrate and encourage students and adults to register, Teaching Tolerance (TT) has put together some greater resources on their “Register Voters” page.

If you’re already supporting voter-registration efforts at your school, share it here and add your name to the Voting and Voices map.  Also be sure to spread the word on Twitter using #UseMyVoice and #UseMyVote.

Even students who are ineligible to vote can pledge to participate in the democratic process with these two pledges you can share with students—and their families—to empower them to use their voices or their votes in the 2018 midterm elections.

The health of our democracy depends on the next generations of voters and voting advocates. There is no better time to commit to helping students register to vote and identify as agents of civic change. For further resources,  see TT’s  Voting and Voices page to give your students the tools—and the support—to participate in the democratic process.

Abolish Columbus Day

Celebrating Columbus means celebrating colonialism, celebrating racism, celebrating genocide. It’s time that instead we paid tribute to the people who were here first, who are still here, and who are leading the struggle for a sustainable planet.

It is time to stop celebrating the crimes of Columbus and stand in solidarity with the Indigenous people who demand an end to Columbus Day. Instead of glorifying a person who enslaved and murdered people, destroyed cultures, and terrorized those who challenged his rule, we seek to honor these communities demanding sovereignty, recognition, and rights.

To encourage schools to petition their administration and for communities to introduce legislation to rename Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day, The Zinn Education Project has compiled a 14-page packet that contains articles, sample resolutions, a resource list, and a poster.

>> Learn more

 

Never Forget – Teaching 9/11

Each September brings a flurry of excitement and anxiety for parents, teachers, and students. Beginning in September 2002 another factor was added to the list: how and what to teach about 9/11.

“Never forget” became a national rallying cry after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Yet America’s schools — where collective memory is shaped — are now full of students who never knew. Because they weren’t alive 17 years ago.  In fact, most individuals under the age of 30 have limited or no memories of the world before the attacks of September 11,2001 and were certainly not old enough to fully understand how the subsequent U.S. response, including the so-called “War on Terror” and its resulting policies, impacted human rights.

As such, many teachers struggle with whether and how to teach the attacks and their aftermath, but, in order to never forget, our children need to be taught about 9/11. More importantly, they need to understand how changes in U.S. national security policy post-9/11 continue to manifest themselves in new and different ways today, even as public and media attention wanes. These trends are especially apparent among young people, who reportedly demonstrate low rates of awareness of issues such as indefinite detention or drone strikes, and often exhibit lower levels of civic participation around national security and human rights issues.

That’s where Human Rights in National Security: An Educator’s Toolkit comes in. The events of the past seventeen years are highly relevant in a number of academic disciplines: civics, political science, law, literature, film, religious studies, international relations, and more. This toolkit provides educators with lesson plans and resources to address these issues in the classroom and to empower students to assess their developments through a human rights lens. It also aims to increase participation among high school and college students in activism and advocacy around torture, surveillance, anti-Muslim hate, indefinite detention, and other common human rights violations associated with post-9/11 U.S. policy.

>> Download Toolkit

Need support? If so, please email us. Human Rights Educators USA has teamed up with Amnesty International USA to gather feedback and improve this resource.

Amnesty International USA Regional Conferences

EVENT DETAILS: 

When: October – November
Where: Various Locations throughout the US
Cost: $15-35

Amnesty International USA is excited to announce the 2018 Regional Conferences throughout the months of October through November in locations across the United States. Regional conferences bring together Amnesty members and other human rights activists to continue the tradition of engaging in networking opportunities, inspiring plenaries, and hands-on skill-building workshops, as well as shaping the policies of the organization.  As activists, you will be challenged to initiate change within your own communities. This will only happen with you – we need you there!

>> Learn more and register