Science, Technology and Human Rights Conference 2020

Date: Friday, October 22-23, 2020
Time: 8:00 am – 7:00 pm EST
Where: Virtual
Cost: $15-$50

Description:
On October 22-23, 2020, the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition will host its first-ever virtual conference. Open to all who are interested in building connections across science, technology and human rights, the virtual format will include new opportunities for engagement. Join the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition as we take stock of progress made towards building effective partnerships between the scientific community and human rights communities.

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Human Rights Classrooms & Elections: Teaching the Day After

Date: Friday, October 16, 2020
Time: 1:00 pm EST
Where: Zoom Call
Cost: Free

Description:
During this event, human rights educators will discuss how they plan to address anticipated challenges and opportunities with respect to teaching after the 2020 U.S. elections. They will also share techniques for ensuring an inclusive and respectful environment around teaching and discussing contentious issues.

Panelists:

  • Moderator: Sandra Sirota, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Human Rights Institute, University of Connecticut.
  • Natalie Hudson, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and Director of the Human Rights Program at the University of Dayton
  • Rachel Wahl, Associate Professor in the Social Foundations Program, Department of Leadership, Foundations, and Policy at the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia
  • Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law and Director, Center for the Study of Law & Culture, Columbia University in the City of New York

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Organized by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University and the University and College Consortium for Human Rights Education.

The Forgotten Slavery of Our Ancestors

When: Wednesday, October 7, 2020
Time: 3:30 pm
Where: Live Stream Webinar
Cost: FREE

Our upcoming classroom film The Forgotten Slavery of Our Ancestors offers a critical contribution to the unfolding conversation about what our children need to learn about American history. The 12-minute film for grades 6-12 introduces students to the history of Indigenous enslavement on land that is now the United States.

As historians featured in the film explain, the enslavement of Indigenous peoples stretched from Alaska into South America. It predated and helped shape the system of African enslavement in New England, and it lasted throughout the 19th century in the West. As award-winning historian Andrés Resendez says in the film, “This is our shared history.”

The film will be available to stream Monday, October 5 on tolerance.org.

To celebrate this new resource, we’re hosting a panel and Q&A with the filmmakers at Wednesday, October 7, at 3:30 p.m. The panel with be moderated by Teaching Hard History Advisory Board member Meredith McCoy and will feature the film’s director and editor Howdice Brown III and producers Marie Acemah and Alice Qannik Glenn.

>> Register here

Teaching Human Rights in Classrooms & Communities

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: Thursday, October 7, 14, 21, 28
Time: 3:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Where: Live Stream
Cost:  Regular rate is $395. Early Bird rate of  $345 (Register by September 25th). Fellowships are available by application. 

Description:
In this online workshop for educators and practitioners, participants will develop or strengthen their capacity to engage in human rights education – to foster knowledge, skills, attitudes, and action for the protection and promotion of human rights among students using rights-based teaching methods. The workshop will include participatory learning activities and active discussions that draw on participants’ own knowledge and perspectives. The workshop will focus on both in-person and online teaching modalities. Participants will have the opportunity to receive feedback on activities they pilot within their own classrooms and communities.

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Power to the People Webinar Series

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: Various dates and times in October
Where: Live Stream
Cost: FREE

Description:
The Center for Civic Education announces a free webinar series, “Power to the People,” featured throughout September and October. These webinars are designed for teachers and those interested in civics, government and U.S. history and in learning the different ways people participate in our government. The series launches with a review of recent Supreme Court cases by U.S. District Judge Mae Avila D’Agostino and Center for Civic Education President Christopher R. Riano. Subsequent webinars will feature scholars addressing Native American sovereignty, the Nineteenth Amendment and social movements, controversies surrounding monuments and flags, the criminal justice system, free speech, and voting rights. 

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Webinar Series: Engaging Students in Civics Education

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: Thursdays throughout October
Time: Evening
Where: Live Stream
Cost: FREE

Description:
Join this new professional development webinar series on civic education every Thursday throughout October from AFT’s Share My Lesson with Facing History & Ourselves, iCivics, RFK Human Rights and more. You can see all of the webinars being offered in the new Civic Education and the 2020 Election collection on Share My Lesson and watch previously recorded webinars on-demand. More will be added as they become available.

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Webinar series on civic education:

Police in Schools: What the Data and Research Say and What You Need to Know
Defenders of Human Rights and Democracy in Your Community
PBS Teacher Planning Kits for New School Routines, Including Civics Lessons
Movie Screening and Conversation – All In: The Fight for Democracy
Webinar – Teaching ‘All In: The Fight for Democracy’
Lifting Up Parent and Educator Voices in Your Community During Times of Crisis
Understanding Immigration: The 2020 Election and Beyond
Election 2020: Teaching in Unpredictable Times
Learning to Speak Across Political Divides: Using PURPLE in the Classroom
Power to the Students: A Nonpartisan Guide for Empowering Youth to Engage in Elections
Election 2020: Are Your Students Ready to Take Informed Action?
Fundamental: Teaching Racial and Gender Justice Amid COVID-19
Civics in Real Life: Resources for Virtual Instruction
Tips for Remote Teaching in a Time of Controversy

Webinar: Teaching Voting Rights and Representation

When: Tuesday, October 6, 2020
Time: 7:30 – 9:00 pm ET
Where: Live Stream Webinar
Cost: FREE

Description:
This Tuesday, October 6, please join the Center for Civic Education and iCivics for a special pre-election webinar titled Bending Toward Justice? Teaching Voting Rights and Representation with iCivics + We the People.

Teachers will hear from Mike Fassold, an educator from Fishers Junior High School in Indiana, as he explains how he teaches the expansion of suffrage using the We the People middle school curriculum on voting rights. Mike will be followed by scholar Henry Chambers, the Austin E. Owen Research Scholar & Professor of Law at the University of Richmond, who will discuss the 2020 Census, apportionment, and gerrymandering. Finally, Emma Humphries from iCivics will explore compelling new infographics and Web activities on the census, gerrymandering, and voting that will engage your students in these topics.

The webinar is designed especially for teachers of upper elementary, middle, and high school students, but is open to everyone. A recording will be made available afterward. Please share this with anyone you think might be interested!

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ISHR Elections & Human Rights Discussion Series

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: Various dates and times (see below)
Where: Live Stream
Cost: FREE

Description:
Each individual has the right to participate in the conduct of public affairs, including through free and fair elections by universal and equal suffrage. Moreover, elections are an essential means through which we can support representatives who are committed to defending and promoting laws and policies that are respectful of human rights. This series from the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University addresses both research and advocacy as it explores various ways in which elections can be a powerful tool for change and tactics for addressing efforts to restrict and manipulate electoral processes.

There will be five events in the series:

Click on each event to register and receive login information. 

Gender, human rights and COVID-19

When: Wednesday, September 30, 2020
Time: 1:00-2:00 pm CT / 2:00-3:00 pm ET
Where: Live Stream
Cost: FREE

Description:
The coronavirus pandemic creates a perfect storm for exacerbating gender-based violence and discrimination. In every area, from employment to school closures to domestic violence to health outcomes, we see evidence of disproportionately negative impacts based on gender. These negative impacts are compounded by intersecting inequalities, including on the basis of race, socioeconomic status, disability, age, geographic location and sexual orientation, among others. Pandemic preparedness and response efforts must better understand these intersectional gender dimensions to avoid further widening inequalities.

Presenters include Christina Ewig, Professor and Faculty Director of the Center on Women, Gender and Public Policy, University of Minnesota, Ruby H.N. Nguyen, Associate Professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota and Katie Spencer, Professor and Director of Advocacy and Public Policy at the Program in Human Sexuality, University of Minnesota. Session will be moderated by Rosalyn Park, Director of the Women’s Human Rights Program, The Advocates for Human Rights. 

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American leadership in advancing the Sustainable Development Goals

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: Wednesday, September 16m 2020
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm EST
Where: Live Stream
Cost: FREE

Description:
The Brookings Institution and the UN Foundation are co-hosting a high-level virtual event to showcase the power of the SDGs in the United States against the backdrop of the SDGs. The devastating health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have exposed and exacerbated stark inequalities and vulnerabilities in the United States. At the same time, protests sparked by the tragic killing of George Floyd have put the spotlight on America’s long history of racial injustice. The commitment to equity, justice, and environmental preservation reflected in the sustainable development goals (SDGs) is more critical today than ever, a foundation to respond to these crises and to build a future that leaves no one behind. Building off a successful first gathering last year on the margins of the UN General Assembly, this event will showcase local innovation, leadership, actions, and commitments from all parts of the American society, including cities, businesses, universities, philanthropy, and youth activists. Their leadership is crucial to a recovery that advances equity and sustainability here at home, and provides a fundamental basis for U.S. credibility and leadership abroad on the defining issues of our day.

Viewers can submit questions by emailing events@brookings.edu or via Twitter using #USAforSDGs.

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