NCSS 2019 Conference – Call for Proposals

The theme of this year’s NCSS conference is “Informed Action: Agency, Advocacy, Activism.” The conference will be held November 22-24 in Austin, Texas.

NCSS is partnering with the National Council for Geographic Education and the Texas Council for the Social Studies to create an expansive professional learning experience for social studies, social science, and geographic educators and stakeholders.

2019 Call for Proposals now open! 

Proposal Deadline: March 3, 2019

>>  Submit a proposal
>> Learn more

Black Lives Matter at School

Mark your calendars! The Black Lives Matter at School week of action will be held from February 4-8, 2019.

Black Lives Matter At School is a national committee of educators organizing for racial justice in education.  BLM at School encourage all educators, parents, students, unions, and community organizations to join the annual week of action during the first week of February each year.

There are many ways to participate in Black Lives Matter at School week. Some educators teach BLM lessons every day of the week, wear their Black Lives Matter At School t-shirt, organize after-school rallies, facilitate their students entering the creative challenge, develop curriculum, post on social media, and rally at the school board meeting. One easy way for everyone to participate is to sign the petition endorsing the week of action

The important thing is that you act in some way to join this movement to bring down the structures of anti-Blackness in education and affirm the lives of Black students in your classroom. 

Email BlackLivesMatterAtSchool If you or your organization would like to support or endorse the week of action.

>> Learn more 
>> More Teach BLM Resources

 

Happy Human Rights Day

Today, Monday, December 10th marks the 70th ANNIVERSARY of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A milestone document in the global history of human rights that is as relevant today as it was when drafted seven decades ago.  

Although the UDHR is not in itself legally binding, it has become the procreator of modern international human rights law, providing safeguards – and sometimes lifelines – for thousands of people from all walks of life when national laws fail them. It has parented 16UN human rights treaties that are legally binding, including the twin UN Covenants spanning economic, social and cultural and civil and political rights respectively, plus a host of regional treaties in Africa, the Americas, and Europe.

We now take for granted that such human rights standards can be used to hold our governments to account, but just 70 years ago there were no internationally recognized human rights norms at all. The very fact that the UDHR has stood the test of time is a testament to the enduring universality of its perennial values of equality, justice, and human dignity.

The promise of the UDHR, however, has yet to be fulfilled because, as all advocates know, human rights are not a given but rather require a continuous struggle to get and once that has been achieved to keep. In other words, it is down to us to promote its ethical vision as new forms of nationalism and populism threaten to challenge our world.  

At HRE USA we believe human rights education is key to ensuring a future in which all people’s rights are respected, protected, and fulfilled. Please consider supporting HRE-USA by making a tax-deductible contribution on our behalf to our fiscal sponsor, the Center for Transformative Action, a 501(c)3organization. Your donation will allow us to continue to advocate for and further develop programming that supports human rights education across the United States.

In honor of the 70th Anniversary and to help everyone celebrate the gift of the UDHR, HRE USA has created this online resource kit. You can also join the international campaign to #Standup4humanrights. 

 HAPPY HUMAN RIGHTS DAY

30th Annual Nobel Peace Prize Forum

EVENT DETAILS:

When: September 13-15, 2018
Where: Augsburg University, Minneapolis, MN
Cost: $25-$130

The 30th annual Nobel Peace Prize Forum will honor the work of President Juan M. Santos of Colombia (2016 laureate) and the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (2017 laureate). The forum will explore the tensions between conflict and reconciliation, between justice and forgiveness, between hope and fear.  Join us in honoring Nobel Peace Prize laureates who have navigated these paradoxes.

>> Learn more and register

March for Our Lives and Human Rights

Everyone has the right to be safe and secure, and live without fear. But in the U.S., gun violence is an epidemic that directly threatens these human rights. Whether you’re walking down the street, in a school or at church no place is truly safe. In fact, 30,000 people are killed with guns each year in the U.S. and 80% of all gun deaths in the world take place in the U.S. (Amnesty International)

According to International Law, the U.S. government has clear and urgent obligations to protect the people living in this country from gun violence. But the U.S. has a patchwork of inconsistent and inadequate federal and state gun control laws and has failed to take all measures necessary to prevent gun violence as evidenced by the most recent shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland Florida where 17 students were killed.

The lack of legislative action to reduce this man-made epidemic continues to hold our country at gunpoint and prevent us from exercising our human rights. Of course, a key challenge is how to enforce these human rights obligations and that’s where activism ,  like the above youth-led initiatives,  play a critical role. We the people must demand that our elected officials respect, protect and fulfill our human rights — including those of people most impacted by gun violence: youth, women and people of color.

On March 24, the kids and families of March For Our Lives and communities across the nation will take to the streets to demand that their lives and safety become a priority and that we end gun violence and mass shootings in our schools today.

On April 20, a second nationwide school walkout has been planned, which marks 19 years since two teens killed 13 people at Columbine High School in Colorado. Started by a Connecticut student who lives within 30 minutes of Sandy Hook Elementary School. Like the previous walkout, at 10 a.m. students will gather outside, where 17 minutes of silence will honor the victims in Florida.

Stoneman Douglas survivors have also spearheaded initiatives that do not require walking out of school, such as their Vote For Our Lives campaign and #NeverAgain: Pick Up a Pen, which asks students, teachers and concerned citizens to write to lawmakers.

Planning to be part of the national actions on gun violence?  Check out these resources for teachers and students.

The World As It Could Be Institute

EVENT DETAILS:
When: Saturday, March 17th
Time: 9:30 – 4:30 pm
Where: Oakland Asian Cultural Center, 388 9th Street, Oakland, CA
Cost: Free. Registration Required.

A day-long Institute by the World As It Could Be Human Rights Education Program. Participants will learn about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and how to utilize the UDHR to take positive action to address issues of concern. Modeled after their successful 3-day Institutes, the program will combine fun and meaningful experiences with creative arts to encourage different ways to communicate and express ideas about human rights in our most immediate circles.

>> Learn more and register
>> Download flyer

Educators for Social Justice Conference

EVENT DETAILS:
When: Saturday, February 24th
Time: 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Where: Wydown Middle School, 6500 Wydown Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63105
Cost: $10-$35

The theme of this years conference is “Building Counter-Narratives for Radical Healing and Hope.” Due to escalating incidents of violence, discrimination, and misrepresentations of truth, many of our children are in need of radical healing and hope. This year’s Educating for Change Conference seeks to hone our great power as educators to build counter-narratives, which disrupt misrepresentations that give voice to alternative facts. This project is historically urgent. Join us in our efforts to use counter-narratives as a tool for fostering hope and healing so that we may resist traditional domination, empower marginalized communities, and move toward sustainable solutions to today’s crises. Keynote speaker, Gholnecsar “Gholdy” Muhammad will be speaking on the intersection of history and language arts ​with a particular focus on the representation of young black women. ​

Make a Difference During International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The 1948 the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide defines genocide as “acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national ethnical, racial, or religious group.” Abuses of human rights are endemic in genocide, and indeed, genocidal acts can be viewed as the ultimate form of human rights violations.

As International Holocaust Remembrance Day approaches on January 27, it is a good time to remember the victims of the Holocaust and to reflect on what we can do to bring about a more humane, just, and compassionate world.  Try this lesson, “Strategies for Making a Difference,” from Facing History and Ourselves‘ newly revised edition of Holocaust and Human Behavior, to challenge your students to do just this. Help them think through small steps they can take to bring about positive change in their community.

>>See  lesson by Facing History and Ourselves

For more information on how you can teach about genocide through a human rights context, please visit our HRE USA’s human rights education library for lesson plans, books, films, take action resources, and more.

>>See further HRE USA resources on genocide

Black Lives Matter Week in D.C.

Attention Educators in the Washington D.C. area!

You are invited you to endorse and participate in the D.C. area Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Schools from February 5-10, 2018 to bring social justice issues into the classroom and empower students of color across the D.C. area.

D.C. Area Educators for Social Justice,  Center for Inspired Teaching, the Washington Teachers’ Union, D.C. area educators, and community members are collaborating on D.C. Area Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Schools. This week of action builds on the momentum of National Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Our Schools campaign taking place in cities across the U.S. to promote a set of local and national demands focused on improving the school experience for students of color.

Each day will explore two to three of the Black Lives Matter movement thirteen guiding principles. In school, teachers across the district will implement Black Lives Matter Week of Action curriculum designed for pre-K through 12th grade classrooms. In the evening, there will be events for educators, students, stakeholders, and community members to actively engage in the movement.

The goal of the Black Lives Matter Week of Action in Schools is to spark an ongoing movement of critical reflection and honest conversations in school communities for people of all ages to engage with critical issues of social justice. It is our duty as educators and community members to civically engage students and build their empathy, collaboration, and agency so they are able to thrive. Students must learn to examine, address, and grapple with issues of racism and discrimination that persist in their lives and communities.

>> Learn More

Civil Rights Movement Teaching Institute

EVENT DETAILS:
When: July 9-27
Where: Duke University, Durham, NC
Stipend/Award: $2700 (The stipend is intended to help participants cover travel, housing, meals, and basic academic expenses)

Application deadline: March 1st

This summer teaching institute was designed by a collaborative team of scholars, veterans, and educators from Duke, the SNCC Legacy Project, Tougaloo College, and Teaching for Change. Participants (classroom teachers in grades 7-12) will learn the bottom-up history of the Civil Rights Movement and receive resources and strategies to bring it home to their students. They will have the unique opportunity to learn from the people who made the civil rights movement happen, and from the leading scholars of the era. Three key narratives will serve as the focus of this institute:

  1. The movement thrust forward its leaders, not the other way around.
  2. The tradition of protest grew out of a long history of activism in the black community.
  3. Grassroots activism was the major engine that led to legislative reforms.

>> Learn more and apply