Facing History Webinars

Facing History and Ourselves has a full list of interesting webinars this month. Sign up today to get introduced to new content and teaching strategies and to engage with other educators and Facing History staff.

Identity, Race, and the Classroom
One of the greatest challenges facing educators today is how to navigate conversations about race in this volatile social and political moment. Central to the conversations are issues of identity, both for educators and their students. This webinar is held in partnership with the American Federation of Teachers (AFT).
Holocaust and Human Behavior Webinar Series 
Facing History recently published a major revision of our seminal case study, Holocaust and Human Behavior. The new edition offers full digital access to a vast array of new scholarship, primary source material, images, videos, and audio never before compiled in a single resource. Join us for a three-part webinar series to learn more about teaching with the new edition!
Teaching about UNESCO
This webinar will focus on teaching about UNESCO and understanding its mission, its relationship to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the implications of the United States’ decision to withdraw from the organization.
Navigating Difficult Conversations: Gender Identity and the Classroom
In this webinar, we will discuss how to facilitate thoughtful classroom conversations about gender identity so that open and respectful dialogue can happen in your classes.
Teaching the Atrocities at Nanjing: Commemorating the 80th Anniversary
To commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Nanjing Atrocities, Facing History and Ourselves will offer a webinar introducing our resource: The Nanjing Atrocities: Crimes of War. The same webinar will be run twice, at two different times of the day, in an effort to support educators in different time zones.

New Human Rights Here & Now Bulletin

How do teachers bring human rights into an increasingly restricted curriculum? HRE USA’s latest Human Rights Here and Now Bulletin will help you answer this question. The publication features guest editors Jessica Mintz and John Terry, who were part of a special team of New Jersey educators that developed a collection of adaptable and accessible model lessons that support the integration of HRE into their state’s curriculum.

>> Download Bulletin

Teaching About the Human Impact of Natural Disasters

In response to the terrible impact of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) has made 3 chapters of their 2010 bulletin, The Human Impact of Natural Disasters:  Issues for the Inquiry-Based Classroom publicly available at the request of the editors.  The book contains essays by scholars and practitioners about a range of topics concerning natural disasters and their consequences, and how social studies educators can address them in their daily practice. The bulletin has a prominent emphasis on human rights issues, and includes lesson suggestions as well as a comprehensive bibliography.

>> Access the free chapters 
>> Full text for NCSS members

CHILDREN CAN BE HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS, TOO!

By Ellen V. Moore

In 1987, while I was co-director of Amnesty International USA’s Urgent Action Program, I began the monthly AIKids’ Urgent Action Program for youngsters ages 9-14 years old. For decades, our UA Office in Nederland, Colorado sent out casesheets to teachers, parents, scout troops, Sunday Schools, individual young people often about youngsters facing human rights abuses in Africa, South and Central America, in Europe, the United States and the Middle East.

Sometimes a casesheet would lay out details of the arrest of a union activist and his children who were with him at a rally.  Sometimes Amnesty was asking for letters to a government official who, with the stroke of a pen, could ensure the release of a medical rights pediatrician in Pakistan who was being threatened along with her family members, for speaking out at demonstrations about the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights article defining basic medical care as a basic human right.

I shared the AIKids’ Urgent Action with my UA colleagues in London and AI United Kingdom almost immediately began its own effort at youth letter-writing, The Junior Urgent Action.  Shortly, AICanada’s Urgent Action Program Director Marilyn McKim began the LifeSaver geared for students from 4th to ninth grades.  Every year, another AI Section either began using the AIKids’ UAs or the youth casesheets from Canada or the United Kingdom, and throughout Central and Latin America AI Sections began using the Spanish language casesheets produced by a Spanish language teacher in Colorado, Maya Meis.

There has always been debate, in education in general and among Amnesty International human rights educators about when and if to introduce students to human rights issues and especially to human rights abuses worldwide.  As I reviewed copies of children’s letter sent to me over many decades from teachers, parents, scout leaders, and young students themselves, I became convinced that in many, even most, instances young letter writers were profoundly empowered by advocacy letter-writing because “doing something” about human rights appears to have empowered the young writers to “Speak truth to power.”

Hundreds of letters written by children using the AIKids’ Urgent Action casesheets are now part of the AIUSA Archives at Columbia University’s Center for Human Rights Documentation and Research which preserves the papers of a dozen human rights organizations and many dozen individual human rights activists worldwide but especially from the United States.

Though AIUSA no longer produces the monthly AIKids’ Urgent Actions, it is of huge comfort to me that both AI Canada and AI United Kingdom continue their monthly letter-writing programs for students with all this implies about students learning that they need not passively learn of human rights abuses daily on the web and on television or in film but they too can take action to speak out to persons in authority urging a halt to unacceptable government collusion in internationally-condemned behaviors against minorities, women, the elderly, children, ethnic groups and refugees.

As part of the international AI Write for Rights December Celebration of the UDHR, there will be and has always been, a case specially written for young letter-writers.  This casesheet is not only for young writers, but new English speakers, persons in literacy classes, families who want to write together to honor the December 10, 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Celebrate the UDHR in your home or your classroom, your school or church by letter-writing with a youngster.  Better to light a candle, than curse the darkness; “Write a letter, change a life.”

Ellen V. Moore worked at Amnesty International for over 30 years as the Urgent Action Program Coordinator and has also served on the Board of Directors at Amnesty International USA.

Teaching Immigration with Immigrant Stories

The Advocates for Human Rights and the Immigration History Research Center (IHRC) are pleased to announce the release of Teaching Immigration with the Immigrant Stories Project. This free, three-unit curriculum for grades 8 to adults helps students learn about U.S. immigration, past and present, through immigrants’ personal stories.

Each unit features several digital stories from the IHRC’s Immigrant Stories project. The project helps people create 3-5 minute original videos about a personal or family immigration experience. Students study these stories within the broader contexts of the U.S. immigration system, U.S. immigration history, and global migration conditions.

Teaching Immigration includes lesson plans, classroom activities, worksheets, background summaries, and up-to-date fact sheets. Teachers may also download PowerPoints explaining complex aspects of the U.S. immigration system.

>> Download Curriculum and PowerPoints

International Day of Peace

EVENT DETAILS:

When: Thursday, September 20th
Where: Earth

Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. The General Assembly declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.

The theme for 2017 is “Together for Peace: Respect, Safety and Dignity for All.” This focus is drawn from TOGETHER, a global initiative that promotes respect, safety and dignity for refugees and migrants. TOGETHER unites the members of the United Nations, their citizens and their public and private institutions in a global partnership in support of diversity, non-discrimination and acceptance of refugees and migrants.

“In times of insecurity, communities that look different become convenient scapegoats,” said United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres. “We must resist cynical efforts to divide communities and portray neighbors as ‘the other’. Discrimination diminishes us all. It prevents people — and societies — from achieving their full potential.” He added, “Together, let us build bridges;  let us stand up against bigotry and for human rights.”

Please take some time in your classes or school to explore the theme of respect, safety and dignity for all. Included in the link below are sample lessons, websites and links to materials to help  build a culture of respect and dignity where everyone feels safe.

>> Access resources

Teaching Human Rights Workshop

EVENT DETAILS:

When: Saturday, October 14, 2017 9:00 AM – Sun , October 15, 2017 2:00 PM
Where: International Affairs Building, 420 W. 118 St., New York, NY 10027 Room 1201

The Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University is holding a two-day interactive workshop designed to help: build your knowledge of human rights, develop skills to teach human rights to your students, and build/strengthen your capacity to promote respect and empathy within your school or community.

Prior knowledge of human rights is not required. For questions, please email humanrightsed@columbia.edu with the subject “Teaching Human Rights Workshop.”

Early Bird Deadline: September 11th

>> Learn more and Register