Media Literacy Course: Using film to bring the world into your classroom

Do you want to learn more about integrating film into your lessons to inspire student discussions and learning on global issues? SIMA Classroom has launched a new Media Literacy Course for educators on Participate’s online, collaborative professional development platform.

Based on SIMA Classroom films and resources, this self-paced course will give you an opportunity to take a closer look at documentary films to explore the impact of visual storytelling to communicate human rights topics; and guiding you through activities that will make it possible to seamlessly integrate film into your lessons. Cost: $25.

>> Learn more and register

Bring the New Zinn Education Project Organizer to Your City

The Zinn Education Project has recently hired a full-time Education Project organizer for the 2017-2018 school year. The new organizer, Adam Sanchez, is an editor of Rethinking Schools and has taught high school social studies in Portland, Oregon, and New York City over the last six years.

The Zinn Education Project wants to send Adam to your community to offer workshops that help teachers better use our people’s history resources and to knit together a face-to-face network of social justice teachers.

>> Learn More
>> Request a workshop

AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition Meeting will focus on “STEM Education and Human Rights”

EVENT DETAILS:

When: January 25 – 26, 2018
Time: 8:30 am – 7:00 pm
Where: AAAS Headquarters, 1200 New York Ave NW, Washington, DC
Cost: $50 (General) $10 (Student)

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Coalition on Science and Human Rights invite you to their next coalition meeting that will focus on the use of human rights in STEM education. At a time when many educators say their students crave new ways to apply what they learn in class to global challenges, a growing number of STEM educators are finding that integrating human rights into their teaching sparks their students’ interest in applying research theories and methods, engages them in research on issues of relevance to their community or society more broadly, and gives practical context to scholarly debates around ethical responsibilities, and the roles of stakeholders.

Can a broader adoption of these experimental approaches improve STEM education, including learning outcomes, retention, and diversity? What resources can be drawn from the human rights education movement’s practices and pedagogies? What are the opportunities for collaboration across disciplines to strengthen these efforts? Meeting participants will learn from case examples and contribute to discussions aimed at identifying key challenges, considering potential models for integrating human rights into STEM education, and articulating needs and opportunities for mentoring and other types of support.

A live stream of the sessions on January 25 will be available on their website.

>> Learn more and register

Human Rights Training Series @ Columbia University

The Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University is holding two workshops as part of its Human Rights Training Series!


Human Rights Advocacy, Campaign Development, and Engagement Strategies

EVENT DETAILS:
When: Saturday, January 20th and Saturday, January 27th
Time: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Where: Columbia University, International Affairs Building, 420 W. 118 St., New York, NY 10027
Cost: Early bird rate of $295 for those who register by December 21st.  Regular rate of $345.

This two-part interactive workshop is designed to help practitioners strengthen their ability to conduct effective human rights advocacy and develop successful campaigns.

>> Learn more and register


Human Rights Research and Documentation

EVENT DETAILS:
When: Saturday, February 10th and Sunday, February 11th
Time: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Where: Columbia University, International Affairs Building, 420 W. 118 St., New York, NY 10027
Cost: Early bird rate of $295 for those who register by December 21st.  Regular rate of $345.

This two-day interactive workshop is designed to strengthen participants’ human rights research and documentation skills, primarily for the purposes of human rights policy and advocacy.

>> Learn more and register

Using HRE to Address Stress in Students

A recent national survey released by UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education and Access, Teaching and Learning in the Age of Trump:  Increasing Stress and Hostility in America’s High School, found that the president’s political rhetoric and policy decisions have spilled into classrooms at public high schools in significant ways, causing stress, polarization and hostility among students. (See also NPR article).

The report, shows that nearly 80 percent of teachers said some students had expressed concern for their well-being because of the charged public conversation about issues such as immigration, health care, the environment, travel bans and LGBTQ rights.  Furthermore, 40 percent said concerns over key issues — such as Trump’s ban on travelers from eight countries, most with Muslim majorities; restrictions on LGBTQ rights; and health care — are making it harder for students to focus on their studies and making them less likely to come to school.

In response, Sandy Sohcot, the Director of The World As It Could Be (TWAICB), suggests HRE as one approach that could effectively address heightened stress in the classroom.  She states, “I’d like to offer using the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as a tool to teachers to guide discussion that could help students better bridge divisive feelings, grasp how derogatory language and actions affect others, and help express the human rights affected by language and policies of their government representatives.”

In her recent blog post entitled, If You Get Confused, Listen to the Music Play, Sohcot further explores how the UDHR could help address not only the issues causing so much youth anxiety, but also the increasingly confusing social-political environment we’re in, and the floating anxiety it generates.

>> Access UCLA Report and key findings
>> Read Sohcot’s blog post

The Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated the United States

By Richard Rothstein

We share a national myth that residential segregation is de facto. It is a myth embraced not only by conservatives, but by liberals as well. It is perpetuated by our standard high school history curriculum, in which commonly used textbooks routinely describe segregation in the North as de facto, mysteriously evolved without government direction. Yet, as The Color of Law recounts, the myth is false. Federal, state, and local governments deliberately segregated residential areas of every metropolitan area of the nation, designed to ensure that African Americans and whites would have to live separately.

 >> Continue Reading

Support HRE for Human Rights Day

HUMAN RIGHTS DAY was yesterday, December 10, the anniversary of the date when the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948.

Human rights education is as important today as it has ever been in promoting peace, dignity, freedom, equality and respect for all peoples here at home and around the world. This year, in celebration of human rights day, please consider investing in HRE by donating to HRE USA’s newly established Flowers Fund.

flowers fund with taglineThe Flowers Fund supports innovation and mentorship in human rights education in the United States. Your tax-exempt donation will enable HRE USA to cultivate the next generation of human rights educators by underwriting a variety of creative activities such as internships with member organizations, research, artistic expressions, and collaborative projects among students, teachers, and activists.

The Flowers Fund was created in honor of human rights educator, Nancy Flowers to continue her legacy of innovation and mentorship in human rights education.

>> Donate here