News & Updates

SIMA Classroom – Student Film Club

SIMA Classroom is the “Netflix of Global Education” offering a wealth of films and teaching resources for the next generation of global citizens. SIMA’s Virtual Student Film Club provides a monthly dose of impact cinema, discussion starters, quizzes, and more. Join students in over 30 countries watching two monthly film picks and attend a virtual exchange with experts and changemakers. 

This month’s theme is “Food Waste,” featuring the film, A Thousand Suns. The film shares the story of the Gamo Highlands of the African Rift Valley and the unique worldview held by the people of the region.  It is one of the most densely populated rural regions of Africa yet its people have been farming sustainably for 10,000 years. Accompanying the film the Food Waste Podcase and a virtual exchange featuring 2021 SIMA Student Award winner Iffany Zou, Inspire Citizens Co-founder Aaron Moniz, and Doona Guerin, the Co-Director of Global Youth Media. 

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Job Opportunity: Program Associate, Engaging Schools

Engaging Schools is growing and recently launched a search for a Program Associate! We’re seeking a student support professional to partner with district administrators, school leaders, and staff members to recalibrate District Codes of Character, Conduct, and Support and implement schoolwide climate and culture initiatives. Program Associates provide professional learning that includes coaching and consultation, and they facilitate change processes with a focus on middle and high schools in urban districts.

Our organization is dedicated to building an antiracist and inclusive culture and an increasingly diverse staff. We’re supporting change and working to dismantle systemic racism in the districts with whom we partner. Given the diversity within and among these districts, we strongly encourage applicants with lived experience of racism and other forms of oppression/discrimination.

This position will remain open until it is filled.

>> Learn more and apply

Guide: Protecting Immigrant Students’ Rights to Public Education

Access to public education is a right afforded to all children, regardless of a child’s or guardian’s citizenship, immigration status, or English language proficiency. These rights were upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in its landmark 1982 decision in Plyler v. Doe.

This new guide from the Southern Poverty Law Center, Protecting Immigrant Students’ Rights to a Public Education: A Guide for Advocates, offers information and recommendations that educators, caregivers, and other trusted adults can use to ensure that their school or district is meeting its legal responsibility to ELLs and immigrant students and families. 

Designed to share with families and available in multiple languages, an accompanying pamphlet offers overviews of this information, easy-to-use reference lists, and links to further resources. You can check out all of the new resources for educators and caregivers here.

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Webinar with Kathryn Sikkink, Harvard Kennedy School

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: Monday, August 2, 2021
Time:  1pm – 2:10 pm ET
Where: Live Stream
Cost: FREE

Description:
You are warmly invited to join the keynote address of Dr. Kathryn Sikkink, Ryan Family Professor of Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, which will take place at the annual meeting of the University and Community Consortium for Human Rights Education (UCCHRE). Faculty and staff of higher education institutions are welcome to attend the annual meeting as well, which will immediately follow the presentation. 

>> Learn more and register

Roots and Shoots

Roots & Shoots was founded by Jane Goodall, DBE in 1991, with the goal of bringing together youth from preschool to university age to work on environmental, conservation, and humanitarian issues.  Educators can join their Roots & Shoots global community, and get access to a variety of resources to nurture the next generation of compassionate change-makers and leaders with 21st-century learning skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving, empathy, and collaboration. The Roots & Shoots model and curriculum guides students through the 4-Step Formula to identify projects, grow compassionate traits, and teach skills to cultivate a generation of change-makers. The program also offers From mini-grants and online courses for teachers. 

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Take the GLSEN National School Climate Survey

The 2021 National School Climate Survey is GLSEN’s twelfth national survey of LGBTQ+ youth. It is a crucial tool in GLSEN’s mission for fighting anti-LGBTQ+ bias in K-12 schools across the nation. The information gathered from this survey will help GLSEN to inform education policymakers and the public about the right of all students to be treated with respect in their schools. Many students in the past have also used the survey information to advocate with their teachers and principals for safer schools for LGBTQ+ students.

Who can take the survey: If you attended high school or middle school sometime during the last school year (2020-2021), identify as LGBTQ+, and are at least 13 years old, tell us about your experiences in school! You are eligible to take this survey if you attended school online, or in person, or a combination of the two. You are also eligible even if you attended school for only part of the year. The survey is completely anonymous.

>> Take the survey

Nelson Mandela Human Rights Lecture

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: Wednesday, July 14, 2021
Time: 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm (CET – Central European Time)
Where: Live Stream on Youtube – http://www.youtube.com/centreforhumanrights
Cost: FREE

Description:
As part of the Nelson Mandela World Human Rights Moot Court Competition, the second Annual
Nelson Mandela Human Rights Lecture will focus on the theme of contemporary forms of racial
discrimination. The lecture is held in collaboration with the African Group of Ambassadors in Geneva. The lecture will be presented online and will reflect on the achievements and remaining challenges of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action. 

The World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (WCAR) was held in 2001 in Durban, South Africa. Its outcome document, the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action was the foremost mechanism which would serve towards bringing the international community towards speaking with a single voice emphasising that such intolerance would not be acceptable.

The Knotted Line

The Knotted Line is an interactive, tactile laboratory for exploring the historical relationship between freedom and confinement in the geographic area of the United States. With miniature paintings of over 50 historical moments from 1495-2025, The Knotted Line asks: how is freedom measured? Just as importantly, The Knotted Line imagines a new world through the work of grassroots movements for self-determination.  This project has three major components:

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National Teachers Law School – Navigating Social Justice and Democracy in Classrooms

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: July 28-29, 2021
Where: Live Stream
Cost: FREE

Description:
The National Teachers Law School is a crash course in civics for teachers, led by experienced lawyers, law professors, and members of the judiciary. The ultimate goal of the program is to equip teachers with the knowledge and tools to foster an appreciation among their students for the value of the American civil and criminal legal systems. This is a free two-day webinar.

>> Learn more and register

Teaching Black History Conference

EVENT DETAILS: 
When: July 23-25
Time: 8 am – 4 pm CT
Where: Live Stream
Cost: $99

Description:
Over 60 presentations from K-12 educators around the world!  Mark your calendars for the virtual 2021 Teaching Black History Conference! This year’s conference will honor the men and women of Tulsa’s Black Wall Street (coined by Booker T. Washington) as well as other Black communities that gained economic independence along with those who were victimized by racial violence.

Carter Center’s Annual Teaching Black History Conference brings together educators who seek transformative and engaging ways to teach PK-12 Black history in both history and humanities courses. Teachers gain tangible strategies to incorporate in their classrooms that focus on content and pedagogy, active learning, support and collaboration, and instructional approaches.

>> Learn more and register